Squid game characters from the director’s life | The Guardian Nigeria News

Through Oreoritse Tariemi

October 28, 2021 | 3:20 p.m.

Squid Game director Hwang Dong-hyuk has revealed that many of the characters in the show are taken from his real life. Dong-hyuk believes viewers around the world resonate with the theme of economic inequality found in the film. Since Squid Game debuted on Netflix last month, the series has exploded, becoming Netflix’s most popular series …

Squid gameHwang Dong-hyuk director has revealed that many of the characters on the show are taken from his real life.

Dong-hyuk believes viewers around the world resonate with the theme of economic inequality found in the film.

Because Squid gameDebut on Netflix last month, the series has exploded, becoming Netflix’s most popular series at launch.

The nine-part dystopian series follows 456 debt-ridden individuals as they attempt to earn 45.6 billion won (£ 24million) playing children’s games with a dark twist; you lose, you die.

The games were traditional children’s games, which Dong-hyuk played growing up in Seoul.

Dong-hyuk’s works have consistently and critically responded to social ills, power, and human suffering, and he has based many of his highly imperfect but relevant characters on himself.

Hwang’s works have consistently and critically responded to social ills, power, and human suffering, and he has based many of his highly flawed but relevant characters on himself.

Like Sang-woo, a struggling investment banker on the show, Dong-hyuk is also an elite graduate from Seoul National University (SNU) in South Korea with financial problems despite graduating.

Dong-hyuk, like Gi-hun, was raised by a widowed mother, and the low-income family lived in a sort of underground semi-basement accommodation.

Dong-hyuk also told AFP he was inspired to create Ali from one of his first experiences abroad.

“Korea is a very competitive society. I was lucky to survive the competition and get into a good university, ”he said.

“But when I visited the UK at the age of 24, a white airport immigration staff member gave me a scornful look and made discriminatory comments. I find it really shocking to this day.

“I think I was someone like Ali back then.”

Hwang Dong-hyuk told The Guardian that despite the popularity of the show, he did not receive a bonus.

“I’m not that rich, but I’ve had enough. I have enough to put food on the table. Netflix paid me under the original contract.


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